Chondrules 2: Hot and dusty, with a chance of lightning!

Now, don’t get me wrong, the study of chondrules is a serious business. Understanding how these mm-sized objects formed is at the very heart of meteorite science. But just because a topic is important doesn’t mean it can’t be fun too! I’ve just spent two very enjoyable and thought provoking days at the Workshop on…

Unexpected connections: LPSC 2015

It’s a bit overwhelming really. So much new stuff to take on board. And now there’s less than a week to go. Nerves are getting frayed and a bit of panic is starting to set in. Well, it’s only natural. Next week sees the start of the 46th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC) in…

The Curious Case of the Train that Vanished

I think we can all agree that trains are pretty big things; they can’t just disappear without trace, surely? But that’s exactly what happened yesterday to the 10.50am service from Milton Keynes to Manchester Piccadilly. I was heading up with my colleague, Diane Johnson, to the Manchester Museum for the first full team meeting of…

European Lunar Science

Way back when I had a job at the Natural History Museum, London studying Calcium Aluminium-rich Inclusions (CAIs), in various types of meteorites. The oldest dated Solar System materials, CAIs are fascinating objects and it was exciting work. My boss back then was Robert Hutchison, an inspirational scientist, who is greatly missed by all who…