Chondrules 2: Hot and dusty, with a chance of lightning!

Now, don’t get me wrong, the study of chondrules is a serious business. Understanding how these mm-sized objects formed is at the very heart of meteorite science. But just because a topic is important doesn’t mean it can’t be fun too! I’ve just spent two very enjoyable and thought provoking days at the Workshop on…

The view from Hawai’i is always clear

I am a really big fan of PSRD – that’s Planetary Science Research Discoveries to give it its full title. PSRD was jointly founded by planetary geoscientists Jeff Taylor and Linda Martel, who are based at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa. The aim of the site is to provide the public with a scientists’…

Chondrules: An enduring enigma

I am really looking forward to the chondrules workshop taking place tomorrow and Tuesday at the Natural History Museum, London. OK, so I have to get up at the crack of dawn to make it on time, but it’s worth it. The origin of chondrules is a central theme in meteorite science. Lots of work has…

So it’s not made of cheese after all!

How did the Moon form? It still remains something of a mystery. Now, a recent paper published in Nature Geoscience has given a new spin to this old debate. Back at the start of this century it all seemed sorted. Everyone agreed, or nearly everyone anyway, that our Moon was formed when the proto-Earth was…